Worth



I haven't been selling. I'm not really disappointed but selling is a kind of validation. It's difficult to know if it's the work in general, the particular piece, the location, the audience at a particular venue or the economy. The prices for my Foundlings are not cheap. I could charge $19.95 for a piece and they would sell like hotcakes. I could even charge $195 per piece and they would still sell but the goal is not merely to sell. The issue is to establish worth. As works of art, these are precious and the price should reflect that. Still, how to charge? By the square inch? The bigger the piece the more the price? Sounds like I am selling carpet. Perhaps by the complexity? The more complex, the more involved the work, and the more I should charge? Some of the most challenging works, however, are the minimalist ones. Complexity just doesn't seem right. I could always charge by the hour. Thinking, somehow, that the more time involved in a creation makes for a more expensive piece but I want to avoid any kind of manufacturing model. I am not a manufacturer. Then there's the success factor. Perhaps the pieces that I think are the most satisfying to me should be more expensive then ones I am less satisfied with. And yet, there are pieces that I am clearly less attached to that seem to be highly regarded. Do I have enough impartiality to judge which works really are the most successful? To know which pieces are actually my definitive works? Which of my pieces are my "signature" ones? Clearly there aren't any firm rules so like the process of creating these Foundlings, I need to rely on a certain amount of experience and a lot of intuition. This piece is called "Stasis". It's about balance.




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