Spiritual Things


I am not religious. I can’t say that I am even particularly spiritual either but I have noticed that I am attracted to spiritual art. I have travelled the world and would tend to be drawn to sacred things: Icons from Russia, Buddhas from Thailand, Tankas from India, and Incan Suns from Peru.


I have also taken my fair share of art history classes. And when it comes to art history, a large sampling of art does tend to be religious or spiritual.


It is, therefore, not surprising that I tend to reference spiritual elements, especially halos, in my Foundlings. I think this is less about a hunger for a spiritual awakening on my part then an understanding that there is much in the world that I don’t understand. Religion, when it is not teaching the “rules” of life, speaks to life’s mysteries. Sometimes with “answers” and sometimes with questions.


I do believe that the exploration of these mysteries are one of the keys to not taking life for granted. To be “awake”, to be “in the moment” is so important to having a full life. It is my hope that in some small way, my Foundlings, mysteries themselves, teach us to look at the world in a fresh way.

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