Persistence of Vision


I have written, in the past, about the problem of what to create. It is no small task to find your voice. It has occurred to me that, completely unrelated to this, but just as important, is persistence. To stick with something until it is right. The problem is, when is sticking to a particular artistic direction a sign of tenacity and when is it a sign of mere dysfunctional doggedness?


Rita Mae Brown once wrote "insanity is doing the same thing over and over again but expecting different results." So what am I expecting? Am I doing the same thing and expecting different results? Clearly I am looking for recognition. Most artists do -from the admiration of the work itself to sales and placement in prominent galleries.


There is also another understanding and that is, as important as it is to explore, I have come to understand that it is just as important to stick to something. To push it. To refine it. To get it to a place that is beyond impulsive. There are many art forms that appear to happen quickly, like Japanese ink paintings. But although the act itself is quick, the process and the training aren't. It has been over eight years that I have been pursuing the creation of these Foundlings. They have evolved as I have. It is clear now, that I am also trying to explore persistence as well. To refine something until it is right... This is gonna take time.

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