Creating


My home is undergoing a major renovation. The good news is that it will double the working space in my studio. The bad news is that I won’t be able to have access to my studio for a few months. That’s a problem.


Speaking of problems, I just heard a brilliant quote by the artist, Mark Rothko that sums up a question I have long thought about. The quote is, “Amateur artists create. Serious artists solve problems”.


It seems to me that making art is not merely about “creating”. Anyone can “make a mark”. Leaving technical skill aside (which is one yardstick by which one can measure a work), I think the pursuit of art is an exploration: How do I show light?; How do I describe a form?; How can I break though traditional artistic norms? It is in the pursuit of solving, or at least exploring these problems that elevate the simple act of creation into something more profound. Something “bigger“ then just creating.

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