Vision & Engineering

There are two aspects of creating these Foundlings that seem so different at first glance and yet are actually part of the same creative process.


The first is vision. To have a vision that suggests a direction is the first hurdle. The process is never a direct one and is largely trial and error. I have talked about this before as it is a kind of “sketch”. Instead of erasing I simply move things around until they seem “right”.


The other aspect is the engineering. Not having a lot of experience with: using power tools; knowing what to do to construct these or for that matter, knowing what I was able to do, was a real learning exercise. Working with such different materials and trying to figure out not just how ingredients fit together but to build the pieces so they would stay together, was entirely a new thought process for me.


As different as these aspects seem, they both entail a kind of understanding: of the aesthetics, of the materials, of how things can fit together and of the direction needed to actually build these. Both involve looking deeply past what is, to what could be. The aesthetics and engineering has been a very gratifying... and sometime frustrating process.



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